The Walking Dead – Season Four, Episode 14

The-Walking-Dead-season-4-wallpapers-7This week’s episode, as advertised, focused on the story of Tyreese, Carol, and the girls – Lizzy, Mika and Julia – on their way through the wilderness. But once again, I feel they got the name wrong. While “The Grove” did describe the setting pretty well, what it should have been called was “Lizzy is the dumbest/sickest kid EVER!” But what can you do? At the very least, it was entertaining and engaging, even if it did break new records for brutality!

The Grove:
WD4_14_1
The episode opens with Tyreese, Carol and the girls carrying on in their journey to Terminus. Along the way, Carol gets to talking about Lizzy about things – how she shot a woman, how Carol’s daughter died, and how they need to be hard in order to survive. They also come across a Walker laying on the tracks that is hobbled, and Lizzy convinces Tyreese not to kill it since it won’t be able to follow them.

After awhile, they come upon an abandoned farm and settle in for the night, noticing a forest fire in the distance. After finding water, food, and getting comfortable, Mika suggests they give up on Terminus and live there, an idea Tyreese approves of. Carol tries to teach Mika to hunt, but finds she’s unwilling since she doesn’t want to kill. At the same time, Lizzy continues to put her life in danger by insisting the Walkers are still alive.

Walker_mashupThis she does by “playing” with one in the yard, and then freaking out when Carol arrives and kills it, and feeding the one they found on the tracks. Lizzy almost lets the latter one bite her, but she and Mika run when other Walkers – still smoulder because of the forest fire – pour out of the woods. They run back to the farm and are joined by Tyreese and Carol, and togther they manage to stop the horde with some well placed shots.

The next day, Tyreese and Carol go out to hunt and gather and he talks about Karen. Carol almost confesses to him of how she killed her and David, but narrowly avoids it. When they return to the farm, they find a bloody Lizzy standing over Mika’s dead body. She tells them, “Don’t worry. She’ll come back.” When Carol goes to take out Mika’s brain, Lizzy points her gun and tells her to wait because she wants to show them the Walkers are still human.

wd4_14_3Carol manages to convince Lizzy to go inside with Tyreese and Judith and finishes Lizzy off. She and Tyreese talk the next day and he tells her that Lizzy was the one feeding the Walkers at the prison. Tyreese wonders if she also killed Karen and David, but Carol tells him it wasn’t, and they discuss what to do with her. Carol takes her out into the woods to talk, and tells her to “look at the flowers” and shoots her. She and Tyreese bury both girls in the yard.

Later that night, Carol finally tells Tyreese how she killed Karen and David, and why. She hands him the gun and tells him to do what he has to do. Instead, Tyreese tell her he forgives her since this is a part of them now; but also that he won’t forget. They agree they can’t stay at the farm, and push on towards Terminus the next day. The episode ends with Carol’s words to Mika replaying, of how they are forced to kill, and how it will change them.

Summary:
Well… this weeks episode certainly set a precedent for ugliness and brutality. In addition to the burning Walkers, who’s heads spontaneously combusted when they were shot, there was also the infanticide angle to contend with. Quite shocking, all of it. But it was in keeping with some of the material from the comics, specifically Volume 11: Fear the Hunters, which is the source material for the show at this point.

Though this episode did change some things around, it did address the issue of whether or not Lizzy and Mika were going to remain as part of the cast, which is something I was wondering about. It also answered the little riddle of who was leaving rats for the walkers and mutilated the rabbit at the prison, a mystery which I thought was dead and buried at this point. Glad they wrapped that bit up too.

wd4_14_4

But, I have to say, the whole “Lizzy is a sociopath” angle felt kind of unnatural and just a little shoehorned. In Volume 11 of the comics, it was two boys, Ben and Billy who were the subject of this story. After losing their parents (Allen and Donna, who were never in the show) early on, Dale and Andrea began looking after them as their surrogate parents. After fleeing the prison and knocking around in the woods for some time, they found Ben standing over Billy’s corpse.

His words were identical to Lizzy’s, saying that they shouldn’t worry because he didn’t kill the brain, which meant Ben would come back. In time, Carl decided to do what had to be done and kills Billy, thus ending the thread. In this case, Lizzy seems to have deep-seated denial about the walkers and cannot bring herself to kill one because she thinks they are still alive. At the same time, she flays animals for fun and murders her sister. Kind of seems at odds, you know?

Still, the way they dealt with this rather brutal and shocking material was quite gutsy. After they spared Judith in the show, I had the feeling that they would be watered down about some of the more brutal aspects of the story. Suddenly, that doesn’t seem to be the case! And as always, this filler episode puts the characters on the road to Terminus, where they are all headed now. And with only two episodes to go, we’re finally going to see what awaits them…

5 thoughts on “The Walking Dead – Season Four, Episode 14

  1. I watched this last night and I think this was one of the best episodes in a good long while. I’ve suspected for a while that Lizzie would be our film representation of the twins in the comic, where one crazily kills the other. I like that this was such a trial for Carol and I think that this actually broke her down a bit. I believe she learned a valuable lesson about life and death and about how you mist cherish that. We all know that the two people she killed were going to eventually die, but her methodology was unforgivable. This tragedy with the girls really brought that to the fore.
    I truly admire Tyreese’s strength. I was actually struck speechless by it. He’s been struggling with his girlfriend’s death, mourning her, and despite this he forgave. Immediately. I think I personally would have been most upset by the lies more than their deaths. Carol flat his the truth.
    I’m ready to catch up with Rick and Michonne though. Daryl…not so much.

    1. I was wondering how you’d react to Tyreese in this episode. He was very stalwart, though vulnerable. And though he still doesn’t remind me of his comic book self, I think the actor is doing a very good job. And honestly, I didn’t see the whole infanticide things coming, mainly because I forgot about Billy and Ben. Are you still reading the comics lately?

  2. I agree with you about Tyreese. I think this actor is doing an awesome job in his portrayal, nevertheless he doesn’t quite feel like the Tyreese from the comic.
    Of course I am keeping up with the comic. I actually just finished reading the latest installment. I am so tired of Negen could scream. Just when I think they’re about to finish him… His latest tactic, smearing their weapons with zombie juice is brilliant and I don’t know why no one has thought to do that before. As a writer and reader and watcher of films, I understand that if we give the people too much down time and too much ease, it doesn’t make for great storytelling. We need conflict for interest. But I’d like to see them catch a little bit of a break! Negen is a fearsome incredible nemesis though, if nothing else. And he is definitely one that deserves a long drawn out and incredibly painful death. I have a few ideas for that, if Kirkman is interested. 🙂
    BTW, whats up with Jamila and her crew?

    1. She’s good, but I’ve had some issues since I published book II. I’ve been rethinking the storyline, which has meant the chapters I did of her and her people have been saved and put aside. I plan to reinsert them once I rewrite the stuff around it. You’ll see what I mean if you get to the end of the second book.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s